Fascinating Bits of Information

I don’t normally write about politics or the war in Iraq, but I couldn’t pass this one up. At least one person knew, with the accuracy of a prophet, what would happen if we entered Iraq to overthrow Sadam Hussein. Listen to these words, which were spoken before we went in:

I think that the proposition of going to Baghdad is also fallacious. I think if we were going to remove Saddam Hussein we would have to go all the way to Baghdad, we would have to commit a lot of force because I do not believe he would wait in the Presidential Palace for us to arrive. I think we’d have to hunt him down. and once we’d done that, and we’d gotten rid of Saddam Hussein and his government, then we’d have to put another government in its place. What kind of government? Should it be a Sunni government or Shi’i governtment or a Kurdish government or Ba’athist regime?…How long would we have to stay in Baghdad to keep that government in place? What would happen to the government once U.S. forces withdrew? How many casualties should the United States accept in that effor to try to create clarity and stability in a situation that is inherently unstable?…It’s my view…that it would be a mistake for us to get bogged down in the quagmire inside Iraq. (reference at end of post)

Do you wonder who was so brilliantly insightful about what would happen in Iraq? Would you believe Vice-President Dick Cheney?

Of course, he wasn’t vice-president when he said this. He said this after we drove Iraq out of Kuwait in 1991. It was Dick Cheney’s explanation of why the first President Bush didn’t go into Iraq to depose Saddam Hussein. Obviously, his insight into what would have happened was incredibly accurate.

 I just thought you might like to know. I’m one of those people who likes to hear the truth, but who is aware that often it’s not the truth that’s being told to me. So when I find spots where folks aren’t being honest, I like to point it out. I rather wish that Dick Cheney, so insightful in 1991, would have been equally honest in 2001.

 By the way, the quote came from a book I can’t recommend. Cheney made that comment at the Washington Institute’s Soref Symposium on April 29, 1991, but I got it from Al Franken’s The Truth: with jokes, pp. 43-44 (footnote). After an online discussion with someone, I had read his book, Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them, which I found to be rated R and unsuitable for children, but incredibly informative. Lies was full of well-referenced information, much of which I looked up myself, and it taught me how to check up on the success of a president’s economic policy. Of course, it was also full of complaints about Bill O’Reilly and Fox News, which I’m sure would mean a lot more to someone who owns a TV than to me. The Truth, however, has more venting and complaints so far than research and facts. It also continues Al Franken’s unreferenced and unproven claim that George W. Bush stole the 2000 election that he began in Lies. It wasn’t referenced much better in that book, either, which stood out because so much else was well-referenced.

Okay, that’s my justification of myself for reading Al Franken’s books, the second of which I found at Sam’s Club in hardback for $4.27. It’s also my explanation of what you’ll find if you try to read him, too. Al Franken’s not an evangelical Christian. The first earns its R rating from me, and I’ve only read about a quarter of the second.

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