Updates at Christian History for Everyman

For those of you that don’t already know from my Early Church History Newsletter, I have been updating Christian History for Everyman.

What’s pertinent for this blog is the teaching and book pages.

I’ve made a page for my books, though only one book and one booklet have been completed. There are, however, five chapters of a book titled The Second Hundred Years that has a lot of information in it. There are also chapters from other books I’ve started and never finished.

I’ve also made a page for teachings (written ones) and podcasts.

If you subscribe to this blog, they’re the sort of pages you would want to know about.

I’m revamping the Christian History for Everyman in order to focus on the second and early third centuries (to give a picture of the beliefs and practices of the apostles’ churches) and on Nicea and the Reformation (to address the periods of major transformation in church history).

Those are the areas I know most about, and so I am going to focus on those rather than trying to cover all of church history, a task that is proving too large for a father of six, four of whom are still at home and home schooling, who was working full-time, but now is a part-time leukemia patient.

That’s not a complaint! The leukemia has let me meet and influence a lot of people. I got a letter from Namibia yesterday saying my leukemia blog "opened my eyes and heart." I don’t even know where Namibia is! (I’ll go look it up in a minute.) On top of that, the love and care of others for me has brought tears to my eyes more than once. I’ve also met some of the most incredible and inspiring people you can imagine. I get to help more with my children’s home schooling. I have no regrets.

On the other hand, there’s not much energy or desire to study new periods of church history when you’re going through chemotherapy. I’m going to stick to the periods I know and that I think are most important, anyway.

This entry was posted in Miscellaneous and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.